Ladybug, ladybug…

…fly away home, or to our home. Several ladybugs seem to reside in our lovely seaside church. Over the winter we have found several of them randomly wandering about the very high ceilings or meandering by the windows. Funny thing, isn’t it, how some insects evoke fear or revulsion, while others are seen as harbingers of good luck.

As a child of Hungarian immigrants who had lived in Germany for several years before their arrival in Canada,  German culture was a prevalent influence in the home and found expression in terms of food, language, and folklore. I was admonished not to be messy like der Struwwelpeter, I read stories about the adventures of Hans, Dora, und der Teufel, and developed a general fondness for ladybugs (especially chocolate ones)!

It is not, however, the  reason that I chose the Schacht Ladybug as my spinning wheel.

Schacht Ladybug spinning wheel.. can you find her?

Schacht Ladybug spinning wheel.. can you find her?

Nor was it because the lovely natural blonde wood and red drive wheel so perfectly compliments our decor..

This Ladybird looks perfectly poised alongside my hand embroidered Pakistani blanket and handwoven wall hanging from Laos.

This Ladybird looks perfectly poised alongside my hand embroidered Pakistani blanket and hand-woven Laotian wall hanging.

The decision stemmed from comfort (I’d spun on a Schacht wheel before), availability, price, and all around good reviews.

I purchased my wheel from the lovely Brenda at Gaspereau Valley Fibres in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. She happened to have a Ladybug available just when I decided that I really did want a spinning wheel after all; and I am all about supporting local business when I can. Brenda kindly gifted me a braid of Malabrigo hand dyed merino to get me started and tempted me with soon to be available fibre blend of wool and linen. I will be going back for that in the spring.

Malabrigo spinning fibre:  Nube, in the colourway Aguas.

Malabrigo spinning fibre: Nube, in the colourway Aguas.

Malabrigo Aguas, single ply on the bobbin. Getting back into the spinning groove.

Malabrigo Aguas, single ply on the bobbin. Getting back into the spinning groove.

The pink/ multicolour hank on the left is a Navajo plied sample made from the tester bits that were on the original bobbin. On the right is my Navajo plied Malabrigo Aguas.

The pink/ multicolour hank on the left is a Navajo plied sample made from the tester bits that were left  on the original bobbin that came with my wheel, the  test drives of others, so to speak.  On the right is my Navajo plied Malabrigo Aguas.

Other accessories have arrived by post earlier this week: Hand carders from Finland. I like these since the pins are set in leather, rather than rubber. I like the weight and feel of these. Not too heavy or large for my relatively delicate hands.

Toika handcarders, made in Finland. Leather pads with medium grade teeth.

Toika hand carders, made in Finland. Leather pads with medium grade teeth.

I also receive my Schacht Lazy Kate for plying,  no more making do with a cardboard box and bobbins strung on knitting needles!

 Toika Carders, Frogtree Meriboo ( Merino/Bamboo) fibre in Delphinium, Schacht Lazy Kate.

Toika Carders, Frogtree Meriboo ( 70% Merino/30% Bamboo) fibre in Delphinium, Schacht Lazy Kate.

I can hardly wait want to try out the Frogtree Merino Bamboo (73/30) fibre in the photo above, it is so silky! It should spin up nice and fine. Perhaps a true lace-weight this time?

Have a beautiful day,

Coryna

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